Amoris Laetitia · Catholic Controversies · divorce · Survivors of the Sexual Revolution

Jesus was right, and we can prove it.

Jesus made His position on divorce very clear:  One to a customer for life. (Slight paraphrase.) Seriously. His apostles were quite frankly, freaked out. He doubled down, and started talking to them about celibacy. Seriously. Look it up in Matthew 19.  With the benefit of 2000 years of hindsight, we can see the wisdom of… Continue reading Jesus was right, and we can prove it.

annulment · Catholic Controversies · divorce · Ruth Institute

Help for Annulments, both for and against

I have had several posts about the Catholic controversies over divorce and remarriage. Here, here and here. This seems a good time to refer my friends and readers to resources that may be helpful to you. If you are a Catholic, and believe your attempted marriage was not in fact a valid marriage, Rose Sweet’s… Continue reading Help for Annulments, both for and against

Catholic Controversies · Sexual politics

Catholics don’t pray to Mary, and why it matters

I asked all my readers to say the Rosary every day, in the last Ruth Institute newsletter of 2016. (You are not a subscriber? Easily corrected.) I gave my non-Catholic readers a non-Rosary suggestion for stepping up their prayer lives.         I got one very charming note from a non-Catholic who was… Continue reading Catholics don’t pray to Mary, and why it matters

Catholic Controversies · Clergy Sex Abuse · Pope Benedict XVI

“A child abuse scandal is coming for Pope Francis”

That is the headline from The Week story by Michael Brendan Dougherty. The gist: Pope St. John Paul II and Pope Emeritus Benedict had made the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) the agency responsible for dealing with sex abuse claims against clergy. Under the CDF’s auspices, the volume and speed with which the… Continue reading “A child abuse scandal is coming for Pope Francis”

Amoris Laetitia · Catholic Controversies · divorce

The injustice of judging your own case

In yesterday’s post, I noted that Austen Ivereigh’s defense of Amoris Laetitia laid out a detailed proposal for how a person in an irregular marital situation might be allowed to receive communion. What Amoris says is that a pastor approved by his bishop should arrange for, in effect, a long retreat involving an examination of conscience,… Continue reading The injustice of judging your own case