Pope Emeritus Benedict Is Right: The Sexual Revolution Is Part of the Problem

Pope Emeritus Benedict Is Right: The Sexual Revolution Is Part of the Problem

So let’s be part of the solution. 

National Catholic Register, May 24, 2019.

Pope Emeritus Benedict wrote an extended essay on the clergy sex-abuse and cover-up scandal, where he cited the sexual revolution coming of age in Europe in 1968 as a contributing factor.

Some critical commentators thought Benedict’s attention to the sexual revolution was misplaced. Some, such as seasoned reporter and Vatican watcher Christopher Altieri, observed that the problem preceded the sexual revolution. Some say the problem is bigger than sexual morality. And to be perfectly honest, some want to say that the problem is anything but the sexual revolution and/or anything but homosexuality.

I’m willing to concede that clergy sexual abuse didn’t start in 1968 and that the clergy sexual-abuse crisis has many other important facets.

In spite of this, however, I maintain that the sexual revolution really is a significant factor. I will go further. We will not get a full grip on this problem until we confront the toxic ideology of the sexual revolution and the damage it has done.

And yet I fully sympathize with the desire to set it aside. Let me explain. Continue reading “Pope Emeritus Benedict Is Right: The Sexual Revolution Is Part of the Problem”

On the Death of Great Men: Fr. Schall, Chuck Colson and my Dad

Crisis magazine, April 26, 2019. 

The death of a father is an earth-shattering event. When my father died in 1993, I felt disoriented. I had never been in a world that did not include him. I could feel myself move up the generational ladder. No one is above me any longer. No one who matters stands above me. When I tried to describe this to older people, they immediately understood. Old men spoke to me of the deaths of their own fathers, in the hushed tones normally reserved for the sacred.

I thought of this when I learned that Father James V. Schall, S.J., had died. He was a father to me as to many. We have all just taken a step up the generational ladder. He won’t be there anymore. Younger people will look to us now at times when we would have looked to him.

I first met Fr. Schall at an Acton Institute event in the 1990s. I was still teaching economics at George Mason and had two small children at home. I was delighted to find that Fr. Schall taught at Georgetown, more or less in my back yard. Continue reading “On the Death of Great Men: Fr. Schall, Chuck Colson and my Dad”

Catholic Culture has Changed: And That’s a Good Thing

My column in the National Catholic Register, May 8, 2019. 

COMMENTARY: The sex-abuse scandal has given ordinary laypeople the ability to facilitate real change. Case in point: the Diocese of Buffalo, New York.
The clergy sex-abuse scandal has irrevocably changed Catholic culture. Ordinary Catholics are comfortable today doing and saying things that would have been unthinkable to them just a few short years ago. And this is a good thing.

More than changes to Church governance, the policies and procedures, changes in what ordinary Catholics expect of themselves have the potential to improve the health of the Church. We have the potential to help the victims find healing and justice. And our new sense of what is acceptable behavior has the potential to pressure the clergy themselves into better behavior.

The ongoing drama in the Diocese of Buffalo, New York, illustrates these points. Buffalo Bishop Richard Malone has come under fire for covering up clergy sexual abuse. The diocese released a list of 42 credibly accused priests. However, the local TV station found more than 100 names. The FBI is investigating the diocese. A federal grand jury has subpoenaed two retired judges who are overseeing a diocesan program to compensate abuse victims. The usual mess.

In a slightly new and different twist, the diocese recently placed several priests on administrative leave for issues not directly related to sexual abuse of minors.

A local news source reports:

“According to the diocese, ‘unsuitable, inappropriate and insensitive conversations’ took place during a social gathering of seminarians and priests on April 11 that some seminarians found to be offensive.”

Five priests and 14 seminarians were present at this pizza party at a local rectory. Three priests were placed on administrative leave. The other two priests were reprimanded for not doing enough to stop the inappropriate conversation.

Of the 14 seminarians present, five have been interviewed as of this writing. They tell a mutually consistent story of (very) crude conversation that most Catholics would regard as (really) inappropriate for clergy.

To say that the diocese has “trust issues” would be an understatement. Many local Catholics don’t trust anything that comes out of the chancery or Christ the King Seminary. This cloud of suspicion is a basic fact of our current Catholic culture, and it affects how people respond.

St. Joseph Cathedral in Buffalo, New York (via St. Joseph Cathedral-Buffalo Facebook page)

When the pizza-party story broke, I saw people defending one of the priests on Facebook. They were sure Bishop Malone was trying to get rid of this priest, whom they regarded as good and orthodox. Eventually, more evidence came out confirming the seminarians’ story that the priest in fact made the inappropriate comments. But the original reaction shows how little trust people have in the Catholic establishment in Buffalo.

I also saw people connecting the dots between priests’ sexually explicit talk in the presence of seminarians, a priest having a “romantic interest” in a seminarian and clergy sexual abuse of minors. In the public mind, tolerance of one issue leads to tolerance of the other issues and to an environment of clergy covering for each other.

Do we, as members of the general public, have all the facts? No, of course not.

In the nature of things, we cannot have all the facts about a private gathering. This is obviously not the healthiest environment for getting to the truth of important matters. But the diocese has only itself to blame. Its pattern of nontransparency induces people to project the worst possible interpretation onto uncertain situations.

This a noteworthy change in Catholic culture. Once upon a time in post-World War II America, Catholics revered their priests. Bing Crosby’s Father Charles O’Malley would never harm anyone or tell a lie. Catholics and non-Catholics alike trusted Bishop Fulton Sheen. Even in the post-Vatican II theological free-for-all, dissenting and faithful Catholics alike would have been uneasy with the assumption that a bishop was lying to them.

Those days are long gone. Questioning clergy and their motives is no longer a marker for disrespect, dissent or anti-Catholicism. We are light-years away even from the scandals of 2002. Back then, some of the best investigative reporting was done by news outlets that also pushed for heterodox changes in Church teaching. Back then, people who loved the Church’s magisterium tried to minimize the scandals. But now, in the post-McCarrick era, Catholic laity across the theological board believe it is socially acceptable, and even praiseworthy, to blow the whistle.

Bishop Malone’s personal secretary, Siobhan O’Connor, was fond of him. Yet she was the person who released incriminating documents. Why? She listened to the victims. She was never the same afterward. She concluded that standing with the victims was serving Christ and his bride, the Church.

A local news reporter, Charlie Specht, has conducted extensive, relentless investigations of the diocese. (Type his name into the search bar of WKBW News along with “clergy sex abuse” and you’ll see what I mean.) Unlike the crew of lapsed Catholics and atheists at The Boston Globe who revealed Cardinal Bernard Law’s malfeasance, Specht is a devout practicing Catholic. He loves and respects the Church. He wants her to be what she ought to be.

One more, unambiguously good sign: The seminarians did not cower. They spoke out. They may get kicked around by their formators. We don’t really know what is going on internally. But these men knew that they would have support from the Catholic community and the general public.

I don’t know if the Pope or the U.S. bishops are going to come up with changes to canon law or new policies and procedures. Personally, I think the old policy was good. Obey the Ten Commandments, especially Nos. 6 (Do not commit adultery) and 8 (Do not bear false witness.) As Buffalo whistleblower O’Connor said, “There’s nothing wrong with the code of conduct. It needs to be enforced.”

Catholic culture is changing. Clergy, priests and bishops, you’re on notice: We are watching. We aren’t leaving the Church. Neither are we staying and going back to “business as usual.” Deal with it, gentlemen. This is the new reality of Catholic culture.

And ordinary practicing Catholics, take heart. Your vigilance is making a difference.

Jennifer Roback Morse, Ph.D., the founder and president of the Ruth Institute,

 recently held a “Summit for Survivors of the Sexual Revolution April 26-27 in Lake Charles, Louisiana.

Continue reading “Catholic Culture has Changed: And That’s a Good Thing”

New Year’s Resolution: No More Defeatism

I have a New Year’s resolution for you to consider. My suggested resolution is doable. It will make a difference in the quality of your life. It will allow you to make a difference in the world around you, including the clergy sex abuse crisis in the Catholic Church, and in the politics of your community.

Joan of Arc: Not a quitter

Give up defeatism.

You know the sort of thing I mean. “Western Civilization is collapsing. The Church is collapsing. Everyone is corrupt. I can’t trust anyone.”  Even worse, the defeatist thought pattern leads to the defeatist behavior pattern: “Nothing can be done. So, I will do nothing.”

Sorry. No go. None of us has the right to excuse ourselves from constructive action.

Don’t misunderstand me: I’m not saying everything is hunky dory. Far from it. We are in the midst of a civilizational shift. The old structures and rules are not working as they once did. We are living in a time of deliberately created confusion, pathological selfishness and the calculated creation of divisions. The world is shaking itself apart. When the shaking stops, we will be in a different world.

For reasons that are not entirely clear to us, God has assigned us to live in this time and this place. Continue reading “New Year’s Resolution: No More Defeatism”

Lake Charles Enlists in the Spiritual Warfare of our Time

This decree, with a cover letter, was read at all Masses today, the First Sunday of Advent, within the Diocese of Lake Charles. Our bishop, Glen John Provost, is strengthening the spiritual life of the diocese. These decrees make demands upon us, the laity. I urge everyone in Lake Charles to do their part to support our bishop and pastors in carrying out this decree. Dr. J

Whereas the Second Vatican Council affirms, “Christ entered this world to give witness to the truth,” and “to carry out such a task, the Church has always had the duty of scrutinizing the signs of the times and of interpreting them in the light of the Gospel” (Gaudium et spes, 3 and 4); Continue reading “Lake Charles Enlists in the Spiritual Warfare of our Time”

Denigrating the Priesthood

Cardinal Kevin Farrell

It is bad enough that Queers in the Church use their positions as cover for their sexual exploits. (See Cardinal McCarrick.) It is bad enough that the “progressives” make bad arguments for Church teaching “evolving.” (See John Gehring’s long-winded NYT whine. Absent from Gehring’s NYT’s bio, is his association with the Soros-funded Faith in Public Life.)

As if all that is not bad enough, Francis-appointed Cardinal Kevin Farrell takes a swipe at priests doing marriage prep. Their celibacy disqualifies them, says Farrell, channeling The Ghost of Jack Chick, and other anti-Catholic screed-writers for centuries.

Sheesh. With friends like this, who needs enemies?

You believe what you want, I’ll believe what I want

Today is the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Back in my parish in San Marcos CA, the celebrations today are out-of-control and over-the-top. My old parish, St. Mark’s, (St. Mark’s; San Marcos; get it?) was about one third Mexican. They went all out for this feast day. I grew to love it.

Little boy, dressed as Juan Diego, in honor of the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

I went to Mass this morning feeling sorry for myself. No flowers. No portrait of Our Lady of Guadalupe surrounded with Christmas lights. No cute little boys dressed as Juan Diego. sigh.

Then, Fr. Trey Ange gave his homily: one giant appreciation for the Mother of God.

Our Lady, Queen of Heaven

 

On the eve of the Queenship of Mary, North America was treated to a solar eclipse. Coincidence?

A week later, Hurricane Harvey was predicted to hit landfall in Louisiana. Harvey had already devastated Houston and Beaumont. It lost strength over Louisiana.

The Catholic Church in Sulphur, Louisiana, is called Our Lady of Prompt Succor. She is the patroness of Louisiana, and of New Orleans. She protected the City during the War of 1812. Her protection is invoked against hurricanes.

Ursuline sisters praying in NOLA during the War of 1812.

Hurricane Harvey just happened to dissipate in the vicinity of her church, in a town called Sulphur. Huh. What a coincidence.

Our Lady of Prompt Succor, Patroness of Louisiana

And just to top it off, we had snow in Lake Charles. Not a blizzard. But a lovely, cheerful, fun snow day. Or should I say, Sneaux Day. On December 8, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. Click here to get in the spirit of a Cajun Christmas.

You can believe what you want to believe. I believe the Mother of God is taking care of us.

I believe I will entrust my work to her protection.

Sneaux Day 2017.

 

The Church Militant Needs the Church Suffering and Vice Versa

The Church asks that we pray for the souls in purgatory, especially in November. We are the Church Militant. The Souls in purgatory are the Church Suffering. They need our help.

There’s only one door out of purgatory for the Holy Souls there. It opens only into heaven. But here’s the catch: they open it by suffering long enough and thoroughly enough to be purged from a lifetime of imperfections.  They are trying to join the saints in heaven, the Church Triumphant on the other side of the door. They can get there a lot quicker if we help them with our prayers and sacrifices on their behalf.

What do you suppose will happen once they get to heaven? Those members of the Church Suffering will become members of the Church Triumphant. They will, in turn, pray for us. They will have our backs.

Remember this scene from The Return of the King?

 

This kind of help can be ours.

The souls in Hell have nothing to offer anyone on earth. The Evil One cannot revive corpses. He has no power to allow the dead souls he has dragged into Hell come back to life and bother the living. The Communion of the Saints, living and dead, gives us an advantage the Evil One cannot match. Let’s use it to the fullest.

Pray for the repose of the souls of the dead. Face it: we need all the help we can get right now.

Transgender Policy Rescinded: Novena for Our Nation

LifeSiteNews reports:

In a reversal of federal policy that pleased marriage advocates and angered LGBTQI groups, the U.S. Department of Justice issued a memo interpreting the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as not intended to apply to transgenders….

Sessions explained that the word “sex” in the 1964 law means “biologically male or female,” so that particular statute says nothing about “discrimination based on gender identity per se, including transgender status.”

Naturally, the LGBT Legal Establishment and their friends in the media have a different interpretation. BuzzFeed’s headline tells its own story: 

This headline is accurate as far as it goes. But, it does not point out that:

  • Congress never passed a law including gender identity as part of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
  • Existing discrimination law was built around the prohibition of discrimination against people for immutable characteristics, such as race.
  • “Gender identity” is not an “immutable characteristic:” an individual does not need a medical or psychological diagnosis, in order to define themselves into the classification of “transgender.”
  • Eric Holder, Attorney General under Obama, issued his own memo back which held that the 1964 law includes gender identity.
  • Therefore, current Attorney General Sessions’ memo simply returns federal policy back to what it was in those dark medieval days before 2014.
  • The steady expansion of discrimination law from race to a category into which a person can define themselves, is not self-evidently “progress.”

The idea that the sex of the body is a social construct, which can be socially reconstructed, and now, personally, reconstructed through a combination of hormone therapy and surgery is a full-out assault on our existence as bodily creatures. We are mammals.  Sexual differentiation between male and female is a reality of the entire mammal class.

The sexual radicals resent the fact that we are created male and female. The transgender ideology is a reflection of that resentment. This is not a small, harmless idea. Nor is it something that is so crazy it will naturally burn itself out. We must oppose the ideology and the ideologues, while showing love and compassion to the people in its grip.

One more thing: this memo was issued on October 4. Thousands of people have been praying a 54 Day Novena for our Nation, that ends today, October 7.

Coincidence? You believe what you want to believe. I’ll believe what I want to believe.

Daniel Mattson explains it all
Dan Mattson. Not Fr. James Martin.

Am I the only one who is tired of Fr. James Martin? I’m not only tired of seeing him fetedby the Main Stream Media. I’m almost as tired of hearing people I agree with, attacking him, arguing with him, or otherwise calling attention to him.

Not that we shouldn’t disagree civilly and respectfully with people we believe to be in error. We should. But, I think we can do far more good by calling attention to the things we believe to be true.

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The Featured Image of Courage The Call of St. Matthew: Who Me? Follow you. Ok.

For instance: who or what, would be the opposite of Fr. James Martin and his Bridge to Nowhere? The Courage Apostolate, which helps people with same sex attraction to live chaste and holy lives. Same sex attracted men and women who are living chaste and holy lives (some of the holiest people I know, actually.) Men like Dan Mattson and Doug Mainwaring and Paul Darrow and Joseph Sciambra.

Let’s play a game. Humor me. Every time you see a post that attacks something or someone you disagree with, do more than “like and share” that post.  Post about something or someone that you DO AGREE WITH on a related topic.

For instance, you could post a link to Courage, or to their film, The Desire of the Everlasting Hills. You could post a link to Dan Mattson’s book, or a review of same. You could post to Joseph Sciambra’s website: this article is particularly raw.  Or this post fromthe Chastity Project. Or this blog from a Latter Day Saint who experiences same sex attraction and who married a woman and values her and their children more than his attractions to men. And so so.

Josh Weed Blog Header
Header from Josh Weed’s blog, gay Mormon man with his wife of 3 of their 4 daughters. (Find out why the 4th one isn’t there. It is a hoot.)

My point: refute James Martin if you must. But do not leave “James Martin” as the final word. Let Dan Mattson or Paul Darrow be the last word.

Or, maybe even let Jesus have the last word, “Take heart: I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33)