Catholic Controversies · Clergy Sex Abuse

British blogger covers Ruth Institute Report on Clergy Sex Abuse

British blogger Mark Lambert (pictured, with his wife) covered the high points of the Ruth Institute’s Clergy Sex Abuse Report. As he says:

“Much effort has been made to disassociate homosexuality from paedophilia to the point where this has become received opinion:”

This predominantly secular paradigm has been adopted by the Bishops of England & Wales, who in 2010, publicly broke with the Vatican directive banning men with a deep-seated same-sex practice to be allowed into Seminary.

In 2010, Marcus Stock, now the tenth bishop of Leeds, then appointed General Secretary for the Bishop’s Conference of England & Wales by Vincent Nichols (a well worn career path) stated:

“To the best of my knowledge, there is no empirical data which concludes that sexual orientation is connected to child sexual abuse.
“The consensus among researchers is that the sexual abuse of children is not a question of sexual ‘orientation’, whether heterosexual or homosexual, but of a disordered attraction or ‘fixation’.
“Many abusers of children have never developed the capacity for mature adult relationships. Instead, their sexual attractions focus on children – boys, girls, or both.
“In the sexual abuse of children the issue is the sexual fixation of the abusers, and not their sexual orientation.”

There could be something to his statement, I know many readers will find these words eminently sensible, except that, as has been demonstrated beyond doubt before and since, the vast majority of victims of abuse (over 80%) are adolescent boys, many of whom are post-pubescent.

This reality has been confirmed by a new report which argues that the evidence strongly suggests links between sexual abuse of minors and two factors: a disproportionate number of homosexual clergy and the manifestation of a “homosexual subculture” in seminaries.
I especially appreciate Blogger Lambert’s notice of not only the homosexual connection, but also the fact that clergy sex abuse has been creeping up since 2002. That is the part of our report that has not gotten enough attention.

“I found that clergy sex abuse did drop to almost nothing after 2002, but then it started to creep up,” he continued. “It’s been increasing. And there are signs that the bishops or the dioceses have gotten complacent about that.”

“It’s not at the great heights that it was in the mid-1970s, but it’s rising. And it’s headed in that direction,” he added.

Read the entire blog post here.
Read the entire Ruth Institute Clergy Sex Abuse Report here. You can download the whole report, and even download the data for yourself. We aim to be transparent at the Ruth Institute.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s